ALPS Electric

Celestica and Flextronics' quarterly sales to the end of June 2000 were up 67% and 139%, respectively, on the previous year, while Jabil's Q3 to May 2000 was up 66%.

When it comes to verifying a networking SoC design with many ports — let’s say 64 or more — the ICE value proposition has declined significantly from the previous decade. An ICE environment requires external hardware in the form of speed adapters to interface fast, real-world networking traffic (hundreds of megahertz) to the relatively slow speed of the emulated design (one or a few megahertz). This adds complexity to the setup, increases power consumption, and lowers reliability. It makes setup re-configurability cumbersome and slow to implement, and restricts the emulator access to single users in a local installation, thereby ruling out remote access. Even worse, it makes design debug reproducibility and repeatability non-deterministic and results in a debug plan that is painful to carry out.

Kanadjian also pointed to new, lower-cost four-layer Pentium 4 motherboards that are using RDRAMs, which have caused Taiwanese vendors to ramp up boards using Intel's 850 chipset. These devices replace a six-layer board design that several Taiwanese companies had said they were reluctant to support. Taiwan's motherboard makers are also poised to launch Pentium 4 products with PC133 SDRAM as soon as Intel debuts its 845 chipset.

Wireless and portable products have significantly different power requirements. Cell phones, palmtops and other wireless devices are powered largely by nickel-cadmium or lithium-ion cells generating several hundred milliamps. Monolithic power controllers suffice up to about 3 amps. The portable market includes Li-ion-driven notebook computers with processor currents that peak around 40 A and core voltages that can drop below 1 V. Basic notebook machines, working at about 3 A and above in single-phase operation, need the support of building blocks for various peripheral functions. Above roughly 15 A, notebooks use multiphase dc/dc controllers and also need external MOSFET drivers.

ptc thermistor applications

When it comes to verifying a networking SoC design with many ports — let’s say 64 or more — the ICE value proposition has declined significantly from the previous decade. An ICE environment requires external hardware in the form of speed adapters to interface fast, real-world networking traffic (hundreds of megahertz) to the relatively slow speed of the emulated design (one or a few megahertz). This adds complexity to the setup, increases power consumption, and lowers reliability. It makes setup re-configurability cumbersome and slow to implement, and restricts the emulator access to single users in a local installation, thereby ruling out remote access. Even worse, it makes design debug reproducibility and repeatability non-deterministic and results in a debug plan that is painful to carry out.

Kanadjian also pointed to new, lower-cost four-layer Pentium 4 motherboards that are using RDRAMs, which have caused Taiwanese vendors to ramp up boards using Intel's 850 chipset. These devices replace a six-layer board design that several Taiwanese companies had said they were reluctant to support. Taiwan's motherboard makers are also poised to launch Pentium 4 products with PC133 SDRAM as soon as Intel debuts its 845 chipset.

Wireless and portable products have significantly different power requirements. Cell phones, palmtops and other wireless devices are powered largely by nickel-cadmium or lithium-ion cells generating several hundred milliamps. Monolithic power controllers suffice up to about 3 amps. The portable market includes Li-ion-driven notebook computers with processor currents that peak around 40 A and core voltages that can drop below 1 V. Basic notebook machines, working at about 3 A and above in single-phase operation, need the support of building blocks for various peripheral functions. Above roughly 15 A, notebooks use multiphase dc/dc controllers and also need external MOSFET drivers.

The U.S. mobile communications industry is extremely bullish on the prospects of introducing high-speed wireless data services,” comments Frost & Sullivan analyst Kshitij Moghe. Unfortunately, the current market dysphoria and sudden financial constraints have given the industry a rude wake up call. The industry is way ahead of its time,” he says, and the current market slowdown has, in a way, helped to stem further speculations.”

Boulder, Colo. – Picolight Inc.'s 32-Gbit/second parallel optical interconnect module features a snap-on ball-grid-array connector for easy integration on the backplane circuit cards of large switches. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-based optical module is designed to help switch makers solve the critical backplane bottleneck for core routers, switches and cross-connect equipment used in points of presence, central offices, said Warner Andrews, Picolight's vice president of marketing.

LKG1V183MESBAK_Datasheet PDF

Kanadjian also pointed to new, lower-cost four-layer Pentium 4 motherboards that are using RDRAMs, which have caused Taiwanese vendors to ramp up boards using Intel's 850 chipset. These devices replace a six-layer board design that several Taiwanese companies had said they were reluctant to support. Taiwan's motherboard makers are also poised to launch Pentium 4 products with PC133 SDRAM as soon as Intel debuts its 845 chipset.

Wireless and portable products have significantly different power requirements. Cell phones, palmtops and other wireless devices are powered largely by nickel-cadmium or lithium-ion cells generating several hundred milliamps. Monolithic power controllers suffice up to about 3 amps. The portable market includes Li-ion-driven notebook computers with processor currents that peak around 40 A and core voltages that can drop below 1 V. Basic notebook machines, working at about 3 A and above in single-phase operation, need the support of building blocks for various peripheral functions. Above roughly 15 A, notebooks use multiphase dc/dc controllers and also need external MOSFET drivers.

The U.S. mobile communications industry is extremely bullish on the prospects of introducing high-speed wireless data services,” comments Frost & Sullivan analyst Kshitij Moghe. Unfortunately, the current market dysphoria and sudden financial constraints have given the industry a rude wake up call. The industry is way ahead of its time,” he says, and the current market slowdown has, in a way, helped to stem further speculations.”

Boulder, Colo. – Picolight Inc.'s 32-Gbit/second parallel optical interconnect module features a snap-on ball-grid-array connector for easy integration on the backplane circuit cards of large switches. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-based optical module is designed to help switch makers solve the critical backplane bottleneck for core routers, switches and cross-connect equipment used in points of presence, central offices, said Warner Andrews, Picolight's vice president of marketing.

Wireless and portable products have significantly different power requirements. Cell phones, palmtops and other wireless devices are powered largely by nickel-cadmium or lithium-ion cells generating several hundred milliamps. Monolithic power controllers suffice up to about 3 amps. The portable market includes Li-ion-driven notebook computers with processor currents that peak around 40 A and core voltages that can drop below 1 V. Basic notebook machines, working at about 3 A and above in single-phase operation, need the support of building blocks for various peripheral functions. Above roughly 15 A, notebooks use multiphase dc/dc controllers and also need external MOSFET drivers.

The U.S. mobile communications industry is extremely bullish on the prospects of introducing high-speed wireless data services,” comments Frost & Sullivan analyst Kshitij Moghe. Unfortunately, the current market dysphoria and sudden financial constraints have given the industry a rude wake up call. The industry is way ahead of its time,” he says, and the current market slowdown has, in a way, helped to stem further speculations.”

Boulder, Colo. – Picolight Inc.'s 32-Gbit/second parallel optical interconnect module features a snap-on ball-grid-array connector for easy integration on the backplane circuit cards of large switches. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-based optical module is designed to help switch makers solve the critical backplane bottleneck for core routers, switches and cross-connect equipment used in points of presence, central offices, said Warner Andrews, Picolight's vice president of marketing.

mov electrical component

The U.S. mobile communications industry is extremely bullish on the prospects of introducing high-speed wireless data services,” comments Frost & Sullivan analyst Kshitij Moghe. Unfortunately, the current market dysphoria and sudden financial constraints have given the industry a rude wake up call. The industry is way ahead of its time,” he says, and the current market slowdown has, in a way, helped to stem further speculations.”

Boulder, Colo. – Picolight Inc.'s 32-Gbit/second parallel optical interconnect module features a snap-on ball-grid-array connector for easy integration on the backplane circuit cards of large switches. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-based optical module is designed to help switch makers solve the critical backplane bottleneck for core routers, switches and cross-connect equipment used in points of presence, central offices, said Warner Andrews, Picolight's vice president of marketing.

Boulder, Colo. – Picolight Inc.'s 32-Gbit/second parallel optical interconnect module features a snap-on ball-grid-array connector for easy integration on the backplane circuit cards of large switches. The vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL)-based optical module is designed to help switch makers solve the critical backplane bottleneck for core routers, switches and cross-connect equipment used in points of presence, central offices, said Warner Andrews, Picolight's vice president of marketing.

Motorola refuses to give out any details about its chip set platforms. When SBN asked semiconductor officials in Austin whether or not 2.5 or 3G platforms would use the StarCore digital signal processor (DSP) technology being jointly developed by Motorola and Agere Systems Inc. in Atlanta, a spokeswoman declined interviews.

Then, there’s the issue of who is nominated as a Director.